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Mapping a positive change

We seldom think of change as a transformation.  Perhaps is the least thing few people do recognize. But without change we keep still at square zero.

Sir Isaac Newton’s three laws of motion primarily explain the fundamental principles of change. To him for every motion to take place, change is the result and vice versa. Here are Newton’s three laws:

1st Law

“An object at rest will remain at rest unless acted on by an unbalanced force. An object in motion continues in motion with the same speed and in the same direction unless acted upon by an unbalanced force.” This law is often called “the law of inertia”.

2nd Law

“Acceleration is produced when a force acts on a mass. The greater the mass (of the object being accelerated) the greater the amount of force needed (to accelerate the object).”

3rd Law

“For every action there is an equal and opposite re-action.”

By these, Newton didn’t establish the foundation of modern science only. However, our need for conscious change is wrapped inside his laws.

1.  Passive or Flaccid person

According to Newton, “An object at rest will remain at rest unless acted on by an unbalanced force.”

There are many people who cannot change themselves. The need for change is none of their business. To such people, time and life are chances. These are people who say, “Let us eat and drink for tomorrow we die.” They are flaccid. Instead of acting upon, they are acted upon just like a rock in the mist of a stream. How precious such people are for labor exploitation. When we fail to change ourselves, we would be changed to change others.

“I don’t need a friend who changes when I change and who nods when I nod; my shadow does that much better.” —Plutarch

“It’s the most unhappy people who most fear change.” —Mignon McLaughlin, The Second Neurotic’s Notebook, 1966

2.  Active or participant person

An object in motion continues in motion with the same speed and in the same direction unless acted upon by an unbalanced force.

Quiet interesting to set on motion. I could perfectly see myself riding cosily down the road and the curves, steeps, road signs and ramps being my guide. Even people who take conscious decisions need to watch the unbalanced forces.

The first step to change is to set on the motion.  And this conscious edge to change will come face to face with unbalanced forces which further adverse, reverse or divert positive change but advance your carrier of positive change.

“When you jump for joy, beware that no one moves the ground from beneath your feet.” —Stanislaw Lec

3. The casual factor

Acceleration is produced when a force acts on a mass

Persistency in life is the casual factor in our quest to achieve positive change. Mass as in Newton’s law is “the property of a body that causes it to have weight in a gravitational field.” (From Word web dictionary)

Every agent of change has oppositions. When people are accustomed to a practice, change however becomes like a dead nettle.

“If you want to make enemies, try to change something.” —Woodrow Wilson

“Never look back unless you are planning to go that way.”–Anonymous

“Problems are the price you pay for progress.”–Branch Rickey

The only way to keep moving is to apply more force. Determination, perseverance, prayers, certainty, hope, are the few stamina tactics to be mentioned.

4.  Press on

The greater the mass (of the object being accelerated) the greater the amount of force needed (to accelerate the object).”

“I saw one weary, sad, and torn,
With eager steps press on the way,
Who long the hallowed cross had borne,
Still looking for the promised day;
While many a line of grief and care,
Upon his brow, was furrowed there;
I asked what buoyed his spirits up,
“O this!” said he—“the blessèd hope.” –Anne R. Smith

I’ve always taken much inspiration from this lyrics. That the best time to press on is when life is tough. Life is always tough and it will not be easy but the only golden rule is pressing on to reach the mark.

When we have something worth to change for, no matter what, we must press on till we get there.  The obstacles we see before are just nothing like the shadows behind us. They keep following while we lead ‘cos they are shadows of things to pass behind.

“Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.”
Martin Luther King Jr.

“If you can’t fly then run, if you can’t run then walk, if you can’t walk then crawl, but whatever you do you have to keep moving forward.” Martin Luther King Jr.

“Not that I have already obtained all this, or have already been made perfect, but I press on to take hold of that for which Christ Jesus too hold of me.” —Apostle Paul, Philippians 3:12

It takes a perfect will to effect change; either on oneself, others or society.

5. The reward

“For every action there is an equal and opposite re-action.”

This, however, looks pretty like, “whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap.” (Galatians 6:7). Baggage in baggage out.

Newton’s third law of motion is the reward of our conscious quest to change. The higher we put in effort, the greater the returns. It just work like the risk reward concept where by the higher the risk, the higher the returns.

Striving to change always demands hard work, higher expectation, bigger dreams and greater faith. There is no dream bigger than the dreamer. If the mind can conceive it then life has no choice to embrace it. The only hindrance to our dream is fear.

“Fear makes the wolf bigger than he is.” –German Proverb

To this end we must be sure that:

  • passiveness leads to change but failure in ones life.
  • activeness is the participant of positive change
  • when life knocks you, push up!
  • life can be threatening but only for a while. Just press on!
  • the reward we get from change depended on our input to change

I wish I could even change not to stop writing but I have to change my position for another activity. Everything is about change, but just change for the best.

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About Clifford Owusu-Gyamfi

The Life of Christ lives in me

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